May 10

Best place to find Bigfoot is Olympic National Park

 

Article from King 5 news –

OLYMPIC PENINSULA, Wash. – In one of the newest Best Northwest Escapes categories, voters chose Olympic National Park as the “Best Place to Find Bigfoot.”

Two Sasquatch experts couldn’t agree more.

“The park and surrounding national forest, it’s kind of got everything, it’s the perfect storm. It’s got ample cover, tons of food, its relation or proximity to salt water and rivers, it’s just the perfect habitat,” said Derek Randles.

“And very little human intrusion,” added David Ellis.

They’re members of the Olympic Project, a group that uses scientific protocol to gather evidence of the notoriously covert creatures.

“The Olympic Project is comprised of several like-minded researchers, biologists, scientists, trackers, and our main function is to try and learn more about this species that we know is there,” Randles said.

They also lead expeditions for novices and enthusiasts, encouraging the next generation of Sasquatch seekers.

“We kind of have a saying that you don’t find Bigfoot, they find you,” Ellis said. “So just be aware of your surroundings in a hyper state and you may, you may hear something.”

Even though the odds of seeing a Sasquatch are admittedly slim, both men agree the chance of having an eye-opening, breathtaking day in the Olympics is 100% guaranteed.

“It’s a fantastic activity and hobby because you’re in the woods, you’re actively searching for something,” Randles said, smiling. “It’s a lot of fun.”

For more information about the Olympic Project, visit their website.

 

Source

12 Responses to “Best place to find Bigfoot is Olympic National Park”

  1. Karen C

    Enjoyed the quote (townhall meeting) of some of the attendies, was very interesting. Going to Washington for the Bigfoot conference in November, should go a little bit further to Olympic Peninsula, what a experience that would be. Can’t wait for all the speakers to share there stories. Loving Life…Thanks Sasquatch Cronicles…

  2. Elaine C

    The Olympic Mountains and Peninsula from my front yard. Give me a heads up if you are visiting this area.

    [URL=http://s1070.photobucket.com/user/cliffy1384/media/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_20160507_204314291_HDR_zpsjnla1rfy.jpg.html][IMG]http://i1070.photobucket.com/albums/u486/cliffy1384/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_20160507_204314291_HDR_zpsjnla1rfy.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    [URL=http://s1070.photobucket.com/user/cliffy1384/media/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_20160507_204306893_zpsee0cxlxs.jpg.html][IMG]http://i1070.photobucket.com/albums/u486/cliffy1384/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_20160507_204306893_zpsee0cxlxs.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

  3. pam

    The guys of Olympic Project can take folks to find sasq., but the TX boys cannot….sad.
    I would love to visir, see if I hear anyhing ,but not so much see anything lol.

    • Jacqueline O

      Hey Pam, I know this is a late post and you most likely will not read it, but, why can’t the Texas boys take people on expeditions anymore? Did I miss something? I know The Great Bob Garrett has to deal with authorities because of the “abandoned campground” fiasco, and they captured some great drone footage…did this create a problem? Does anyone have any information?

    • Elaine C

      Maybe I should rephrase what I said above. Olympic Peninsula is about 3600 square miles of dense forest, rain forest and mountains, it probably isn’t easy to find and collect evidence in such an area.

  4. mescha m

    I grew up there riding horses all over the foothills. I never even thought of bigfoot then.. lots of deer.. and grouse.. lots of old abandoned homesteads.. when you are back in those woods there is nobody around for miles…

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