Home Forums Sasquatch Forum What are we waiting for?

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  • #152721
    Chuck P
    Participant

    It’s crazy how you hear of people loosing their jobs etc over this. I don’t necessarily believe that would ever be the case for me (but ya never know I guess).

    On the bright side maybe I could get an early retirement out of it! LOL . That’s a funny Gif also hahahah .

    #152722
    Thomas W
    Participant

    I think lots of “researchers” have gone to “hot spots” in an attempt to bring the “fight” to the Squatch. So far nobody has produced anything that is really all that credible beyond footprints and eyewitness accounts plus some audio. E.g the Sierra sounds came from a hotspot where there was regular interaction. Awesome but not scientifically conclusive which requires a least one “type” specimen or body.

    Now bagging a Sasquatch is not a trivial task, though certainly easier than Snipe hunting because the Squatch does, in fact, exist ask the folks in Honobia OK how easy it was……The managed to kill/mortally wound one but the other members of the troop carried it off (in pieces if I recall correctly).

    Wes recommends a throat shot vs. a head or chest placement per some military contacts. Good luck but make sure you have a last will and testament in place before engaging.

    I could care less about what “science” or the broader public “think” about Sasquatch….They are out there, are reasonably common and a fascinating enigma….Live and let live.

    #152724
    Chuck P
    Participant

    @ Thomas W.. Thanks for your comments and insight. Very interesting. If I recall there was an episode some time ago where two Latter Day Saint missionaries (mormons) were teaching an older gentleman who had in his earlier years served in a law enforcement capacity. In his account he tells the missionaries how the Gov had contacted his law enforcement agency asking for assistance with the capture and removal of these creatures in on particular area/canyon.

    He goes on to state how he was in a chopper and during the course of the event was taking pictures and audio of how the scene unfolded. Really an amazing account and tragic all in the same if that makes sense. Not sure if u might remember that show I”m talking about. I find that very interesting considering there are two agencies one being federal and the other local .

    #152725
    Bob B
    Participant

    @ToWhomItMayConcern: when you do go after Sasquatch and or Dogman make sure to remove the front sight from your rifle and pistol….that way it won’t be so painful for you when, as you are taking in that serene moment of accomplishment at having shot one dead, one of the other members of its troop, you didn’t know were there, takes your weapon from you and begins to vigorously shove it where the sun doesn’t shine.

    In all seriousness, only out of self defense or the defense of another would I pull the trigger on Sasquatch. Dogman is a different story, but likely the same issue: numbers.

    The Sasquatch I saw was incredibly large. Why shoot something that you can’t drag out of the woods; something you are not capable of putting in a truck or trailer, without mechanical lifts; and, something the MEBs will instantly seize from you (not to mention the grief that follows)?

    They exist. Your mileage may vary if you just gotta be “that guy”..and if so, best of luck to you.

    a/k/a: Bob B

    #152728
    Paul A
    Participant

    @Bob B

    You aren’t just whistling dixie there.


    @Chuck
    P

    You are wanting to see a sasquatch or have your own encounter. Many would get that but I don’t. To me, it has been little more than a royal PITA. I can, however, give you some advice.

    A couple of hours of investigation, or even a day or two, will almost always give you squat. Running to and fro chasing reports the same. It will take time and knowledge of their habits to find them. That is true of any critter on planet earth unless the population of the target specie is just thick as flies.

    I lived on my property for a very, very long time before these things showed up. I would probably still not believe if they hadn’t become aggressive enough to make it obvious even to a thickheaded numbskull like me. Now, I don’t believe, I know they exist.

    I have spent way over 30 years in the outdoors now, and had my first experience that I know for sure only within the last decade.

    Why is that important? You aren’t going to know they are there unless they want you to, or unless by sheer accident. It is that simple.

    I wouldn’t care if people came over to visit and try to get a glimpse or experience, except that there is no guarantee that the people would listen to me, once here. Let’s say that I could trust these strangers with my property and around my children without knowing them personally except from a forum. Just say it was advisable and I let them come. Max, they would be here for a week. Most would be here for a couple of hours, a night, or at best a weekend.

    However, I can’t even guarantee when or what type of experience I will have next. If someone wanted to camp out for six months or so, I would almost guarantee some form of encounter, as that is the longest I have gone without at least something happening Sasquatch related.

    Say they did have an encounter. These local boys are touchy. If some jerk starts gifting, I have to deal with it after the jerk leaves. Say they make one mad, I get to deal with that for as long as the squatch chooses to hold a grudge. If they kill one, even in self-defense, I get to deal with the war I know that will follow.

    #152732
    Wolf
    Participant

    The episode Chuck mentions is one of the few ‘dunno-bout-that’ episodes Wes had aired.

    Some red flags were:
    1, why would an ‘agency’ made up of highly trained goons resort to using a marksman they did not know? Surely they would have at their disposal some of the best snipers in the business?
    2, why would an agency devoted to maintaining the cover-up bring in outsiders to participate with literally no security clearance checks?
    3, why would you try and shoot any animal from a helicopter… arguably the most unstable platform for sniping you could imagine?

    #152733
    BirdMama
    Participant

    @Paul A when did they first show up and what do you think was the cause? Don’t mind me I’m just curious.

    #152735
    Chuck P
    Participant

    @Bob.. thanks bob for shedding more light on the why we perhaps shouldn’t . That’s why these forums are good bc it’s important to see others points of views ! Thanks for the good insight !


    @Wolf
    .. though a fascinating experience I to agree with there being some red flags . What u mention is correct in a lot of ways . Maybe it did truly happen but then again maybe it didn’t. I don’t know what to really think of it .

    #152747
    Gumshoguy
    Moderator

    Some red flags were:
    1, why would an ‘agency’ made up of highly trained goons resort to using a marksman they did not know? Surely they would have at their disposal some of the best snipers in the business?
    2, why would an agency devoted to maintaining the cover-up bring in outsiders to participate with literally no security clearance checks?
    3, why would you try and shoot any animal from a helicopter… arguably the most unstable platform for sniping you could imagine?

    —————–

    From hogs in Texas, to wild horses on the plains to dangerous predators in Africa or the wolves in Canada darting or shooting from helicopters is the preferred method whether for medicating or culling a specific group of animals.

    In the military door gunners provide security for airships. They are not necessarily snipers but equally effective.

    Drones are used to expose targets and direct ground forces safely to a known target.

    Gunmen mounted from helicopters or airships provide a tactical advantage of seeing potential targets from great distances while extending a disadvantage to a known or unknown target on the ground since it is easier to conceal oneself from another on land than from above.

    #152748
    Gumshoguy
    Moderator

    “why would an agency devoted to maintaining the cover-up bring in outsiders to participate with literally no security clearance checks?”

    —————

    Many terrorist organizations, organized crime and intelligence groups use similar strategies under the premise the less one knows the better so they bring in an outside contractor for special “wet” work, or “painting houses,” and they do a job and disappear.

    These individuals (button men or women) are paid to not ask questions but to do a specific job; wet or cleanup or otherwise sanitize the work to decrease chances of leaving behind any evidential value.

    It is therefore all part of the insulation process of concealing those making decisions and pulling the strings because you really don’t know what you don’t know.

    Three can keep a secret if two are dead.

    Should something go wrong these independent “contractors” have no strings attached to any particular group or organization.

    #152750
    Paul A
    Participant

    @BirdMama

    I don’t mind — to the best of my knowledge and recollection I first noticed activity going on seven years ago come January. The bad thing is I don’t know for sure. They could have been in the area longer and I wouldn’t have known. It started with wood knocks in my belt in the middle of January. It was one of those cold wind-still nights. Three sets of three. I had gone to bed late, and just when I was drifting off to sleep the first set happened. After the third set I grabbed my 870 and yelled out my back door that whoever it was had better stop.

    Truthfully, I think they come to my place for food: deer use the shelter-belt for cover, the gardens I used to grow, and the numerous mulberry trees I have growing in my belt. There is even a year-round water source only 1/4 mile away tht all the wild animals use as a water hole. I get that impression after the fact though, due to the hunting structure, tracks in gardens, and occasional mulberry trees getting stripped of fruit before I have a chance to pick. Not to mention the fact that I am surrounded by fields that get everything planted from soybeans and wheat to corn. Rabbits, rats, mice, racoons, possum, and other small mammals abound. I can understand why they would want farmland despite the general lack of cover, which would make inconspicuous travel harder.

    This whole area is often a giant smorgasbord.

    #152775
    BirdMama
    Participant

    @Paul A based on what you described it does sound like they come to your place for food. Like accidental habituation. Have you had any aggressive ones around?

    #152785
    Paul A
    Participant

    @Birdmama

    If you include calling actions such as ripping the screen door almost off my house, twisting the square rods inside locked door knobs into corkscrews, growling at me and my nephew, trying to lure my daughter into the belt using my voice, and slapping the side of the house hard enough to crack windows, etc., aggressive?

    To be fair, I haven’t noticed aggressive behaviour much lately, just watching, throwing pebbles onto my relatively new tin roof when I am sitting on the front porch, messing with my dogs, occasionally opening and closing car doors(at least what it sounds like), etc., — basically what I generally consider minor activity now. Occasionally I hear the morse code style teeth clacking. That in itself is interesting — it is a clicking noise like small rocks being rapidly smacked together, but in patterns that sometimes repeat. You hear it from an area, then it stops and a reply comes from another area. Sometimes there are several areas taking turns. You never hear two areas doing it at the same time though. It makes me think they have their own version of morse code.

    A the start though, dang. I literally thought I was going to have no choice but to start shooting (first three to four years were a nightmare). After several months and some of the major activity, I knew it wasn’t humans and started checking the net to see what it could be. I watched hours of documentaries and figured out it was probably sasquatch, then I found Sasquatch Chronicles.

    #152787
    BirdMama
    Participant

    @Paul A goodness that’s a lot going on. House slapping, Trying to lure your daughter away and attempting to get inside could be considered aggressive as its not respecting your boundaries and thinks it can just come right into your property.

    It’s just strange it would behave this way if there is plentiful food and water source around for it.

    Do you think it’s a lone wolf or is there more than one?

    #152788
    Paul A
    Participant

    @Birdmama

    I thought it was one at first, but over the years I have seen several track sizes, including at least one child. I have a minimum of five critters, so I am assuming a family group. The child’s track was interesting. A couple of tracks in a little structure made by twisting off small evergreen branches inside at the base of a large cedar about thirty feet down the row from the big hunting structure the adults made in my shelterbelt. It was like the kid was play acting like momma and daddy, literally what it reminded me of.

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