Home Forums Sasquatch Forum Trail cams – thoughts after listening to Ep 270

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  • #168590
    Daniel O
    Participant

    After Listening to Ep 270 after show chat. Trail cams and Sasquatch

    Does Sasquatch know what a trail cam is?
    Most Likely no. They should be aware of the association between
    man made things and man. If you hate man, you also hate/disrespect his things.

    Now lets say he also can notice infrared and or hears the frequencies that electricity makes (yes it does generate sound freq.) . He see’s a beam of something coming out of it or hears it (what you see as a reputation of man), what would you expect Sas to do? Would you avoid something that represented extreme danger to you? What would you do to the device?

    What other tech do we intentionally leave in the forest all over the continent, in the same amount or more as a trail cam?

    #168594
    Justin Z
    Participant

    Seismic sensors like the movie tremors lol Wonder it big foot has the power to set them off

    #168607
    Knobby
    Moderator

    There are lots of theories on how sasquatches know to avoid trail cams. One of the most common theories is they see infrared light from trail cams. Its a bad theory though since trail cams do not emit IR unless taking a photo or filming video. The motion sensor must first trigger the camera before it emits IR light.

    An interesting assertion (or factoid) is they only avoid working trail cams. If the batteries die in a trail cam aimed at a feeding station they will take the food. But if the camera is working they will not.

    One interesting theory is they can see the electromagnetic field generated by electricity. Its only recently come to light that some animals can see earth’s magnetic field, including some primates. The reason some dogs walk in a circle before defecating is they are aligning themselves with earth’s magnetic field before doing the deed. So, if true they would be able to detect even cleverly hidden trail cams.

    #168695
    Augustine L
    Participant

    I think they first avoided them just on principle–when in doubt, play it safe.

    Then I think they figured out what cameras are. I realized a few years back that, when I use the little pop-out display screen to review the pics I just took, any sasquatch sneaking a look over my shoulder could figure out what the device does. And guys also do use those card-reader things to see their trail cam pics, so. . . .

    #168714
    David R
    Participant

    If you think how powerful a Brown Bear is then imagine that on 2 legs that can run on 4 if need be. Smart as a whip, and can see at night! Some can be as strong as an ox, that can be as mad as a water buffalo. Then you could have the gentile giants that will save your life if need be. We don’t know! We just hear stories about them, and hope they are true.

    #168716
    Knobby
    Moderator

    They avoid well hidden/camouflaged trail cams. There is something about the operation of trail cams that they detect.

    #168721
    paul w
    Participant

    I think they see the infra red like a spotlight. and to them when its nighttime a big blaring light makes them go “Nope nope unh uh aint going near that” I doubt its the sound or function but it shines in a spectrum visible to them. They do make good anti bigfoot protection around your homes if you have them. Maybe the IR is extremely intense to them and since it is a weird light even to us because it lights up the dark and we dont see it maybe its X2 intense for them so picture a million candle power spotlight…we see that boy do we ever. Maybe that tiny IR is like that to them.

    #168737
    Knobby
    Moderator

    Trail cams do not emit infrared light unless the motion sensor triggers them to record a photo or video. They are not actively emitting IR light. Another thing against the infrared light theory is daylight. The sun emits all spectrums of light including infrared which would drown out any light emitted by trail cams.

    #168744
    Steven B
    Participant

    “Another thing against the infrared light theory is daylight. The sun emits all spectrums of light including infrared which would drown out any light emitted by trail cams.”

    There would be a way to test this out if someone with a little electronic “know-how” would do it. Remove the infrared motion sensors and replace them with microwave motion sensors. If all of a sudden lots of photos/video get taken, then it is the infrared. If all remains the same, they are sensing something else.

    #168752
    Knobby
    Moderator

    Steven, there are no infrared motion sensors emitting IR. They do not exist. IR motion sensors are passive. In other words those sensors detect changes in IR light, they emit nothing themselves. As I’ve said before, the only time trail cams ever emit IR light is when they are triggered to record something. They are not constantly shinning IR light (none of them).

    Moreover, you can’t expect sasquatches to see this light in sunlight anyway. This common theory that sasquatches detect trail cams by seeing IR light is made up in people’s minds devoid of any science. And I’m not aware of any supporting anecdotal evidence either.

    No known animal with night vision can see in the infrared spectrum. That doesn’t mean sasquatches are not the exception, but we can’t see into the infrared spectrum, and seeing into the infrared will not help detect trail cams anyway unless they see it flash when taking a picture “at night.”

    #168794
    m99
    Participant

    So Knobby, why do you think the Sasquatch are so good at detecting and avoiding the cams?

    #168799
    Knobby
    Moderator

    It’s unknown m99. There are many theories. In my first reply to this thread I mentioned a possible source. Theories range from hearing the motion sensors, hum of electrical devices, to seeing the electromagnetic waves created by electrical devices.

    If its hearing motion sensors it could be that motion sensors on flood lights have sensitized them to that. Its unknown how they detect them but for some reason seeing infrared light has become a common theory accepted as fact by many when in fact trail cams are not actively emitting IR light unless they are recording, something not necessary in daylight.

    Most motion sensors have a dual mode of sensing to eliminate false triggering, to where both must detect a change to trigger the device. Most have PIR (passive infrared), plus one other like microwave or ultrasonic. The PIR does not emit any light, but rather detects changes in the infrared spectrum.

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