Home Forums Sasquatch Forum How Sasquatches "glide" as they walk

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  • #90025
    Andrew B
    Participant

    I’ve never had an encounter, but after listening to how they seem to “glide” or “float” when walking, I thought of how Skiers Glide effortlessly when doing what’s known as the “diagonal stride” as shown here ~ specifically starting at the 00:24 second mark. What do you all think. http://youtu.be/G3Vue10ItXg

    #90027
    Curly N.S.
    Participant

    It’s for sure a very common theme it seems, it would be something to see for sure. Also why the spin of it seeming supernatural/paranormal gets pinned to it?

    #90117
    Mac M
    Participant

    I wondered if Jeff Meldrum would have an idea about this.

    Compliant Gait
    The dynamic signature of the footprints concurs with numerous eyewitness accounts noting the smoothness of the gait exhibited by the Sasquatch. For example, one witness stated, “…it seemed to glide or float as it moved.” Absent is the vertical oscillation of the typical stiff-legged human gait. The compliant gait not only reduces peak ground reaction forces, but also avoids concentration of weight over the heel and ball, as well as increases the period of double support.

    http://www2.isu.edu/~meldd/fxnlmorph.html

    #90124
    Knobby
    Moderator

    Sasquatches do not lock the knee when they walk like we do. We in effect pole vault to the next step which makes up bob up and down as we walk. Because sasquatches keep the knees bent they do not bob up and down, but have what’s called a “compliant gait” where they glide along smoothly.

    Dr. Meldrum claims to have observed this compliant gait when he watched one walking via night vision when he was with Todd Standing, Sonya Zohar, and Dr. John Bindernagle.

    Meldrum Describes his Bigfoot Sighting at the Sasquatch Summit 2014

    #90131
    Monkey422Paw
    Participant

    Humans don’t walk very well; Bigfoot does. So say’th Lloyd Pye.

    #90132
    Lee F
    Participant

    I thought their walk was best described as with their knees bent & they pull themselves along with their forward foot, while humans push forward from the trailing foot.
    Pulling themselves with their forward foot accounts for the mound of soil that is pushed up from their toes.

    #90139
    David R
    Participant

    The other thing that is weird is when they get on their fingers, and toes like Wes, and Woody’s encounter. Wes said it crawled like a spider would. I think that when they get on all fours they can cover a lot more ground very quickly, and that could help them catch prey also!

    #90143
    Knobby
    Moderator

    Lee, no that’s not what causes the raised mound of soil seen in some of their footprints. Its caused by the midtarsal break or hinge in the foot. Their feet flex in the center.

    Sasquatches plant their whole foot, leaving an impression from the heel to the toes. But as they continue the step the foot flexes in the middle (illustrated above), lifting the heel, and the front half of the foot pushes mud back a little creating a small ridge (raised area) in the center of the footprint. This raised ridge indicates it has a midtarsal break.

    Sasquatches don’t pull themselves along with the front leg. They push off, and when the heel raises as the foot flexes in the middle it pushes up a small mound of mud or sand behind the front half of the foot.

    #90145
    Knobby
    Moderator

    David R, most of the time they are observed on all fours they are trying to be stealthy, and even if they start off running from that all fours position they transition to bipedal running, and I think that has the greater speed.

    Above is a still from a video that shows a juvenile sasquatch start off running on all fours and transition to two legs. Unfortunately that video is now private and I can’t post it here.

    #90146
    David R
    Participant

    Thanks Knobby! I was also wondering if they can grip things with their feet?

    #90149
    Knobby
    Moderator

    I’ve wondered if the foot flexing in the center might help them climb trees (they are great climbers, trees, cliffs, etc.), but I don’t know if that is the case.

    I’ve never heard of them gripping or using their feet like their hands.

    #90172
    David R
    Participant

    That’s because nobody has seen it! It would be great for them climbing trees, and if they are part ape then ????

    #90191
    Lee F
    Participant

    Knobby-
    I was going off of a video that Jeff Meldrum had put out – perhaps I misunderstood what he was saying. I will try to find it….

    #90197
    michael n
    Participant

    Knobby, I would love to see that video as you can tell from the still that there is a squatch there.
    I also believe that it helps them hunt and keep their eyes on their prey by running so smoothly. If you ever watch a big cat chase prey in slow motion everything moves but their head. It is as still and focused as can be.

    #90212
    Knobby
    Moderator

    michael n, yes, I hate that the video is now private and not viewable. It was one of my favorites. Its from a boy who went out to film the aftermath of a tornado on his cell phone. The juvenile might have been displaced/separated from its parents during the storm. It first runs on all fours and then transitions to bipedal.

    I did a search to see if there were Tornadoes at that time and place and there were. Most sightings are so quick that unless you already have a camera out you would never film it, and this is one of those instances where someone was already filming. It screams at him and takes off running.

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